Sparrow Vs. The Phantom, Episode 1

Phantom  is a really good person and a really awesome person.  He did a Krampuskarten project a year or so ago that I wrote about here.

Phantom is the fantastic artist who created the sketch used on the Perchta Prayer cards that I leave in Wal-mart bathrooms and on tables at such fine dining establishments like as McDonald’s and Taco Bell and at gas pumps.

Phantom’s cat, Edmond, has had some unexpected emergency vet bills, so he needs money.  Well, what does Phantom do for a living, you might ask.  Well for the next tiny bit of time, he will continue as a teaching assistant at a really big college, but the semester will be ending soon and so will the pay check.  If you know anything about academia, teaching assistants are worse off than share croppers and slightly better off than slaves.  I’m not sure what his next plans are; that’s part of the reason why this segment was created.  Phantom had set up a “Help Edmond” fund:   https://life.indiegogo.com/fundraisers/edmond-s-vet-bills-fund,  but that campaign has ended. Phantom is also excepting requests for commissions.  He does great quality work quickly for a very reasonable price.  To get a piece, email KrabatRaben@yahoo.com  See more of the Phantom at http://phantomseptember.deviantart.com/ and http://phantomseptember.tumblr.com/

Deneb by Phantom September

(Code: Sparrow=pink; Phantom=green)

What is it about the fin de siecle that you like?  Does your fondness of the fin de siecle extend to the Belle Epoque and all things Edwardian?  

Up front, I’d like to mention that my real love is the “long nineteenth century,” since I really love the different aesthetics and philosophies that circulate throughout the whole century (plus a few extra decades at each end). One of the central things I really love is the century’s fixation with death. Absolutely love it. 
The easy answer, of course, is that I like almost everything. There are so many things, it’s hard to go deeper than that without repeating the same sentiment except at greater length. The things I especially appreciate are the period’s aesthetics, the obsession with the occult and science, and the various social and philosophical discourses of the time. Naturally there are a lot of unlikeable things about the time, but overall I find the fin de siècle (as included under the umbrella of the long nineteenth century) aesthetically and intellectually stimulating. As for the many not-so-great things of the time, I think it’s important to look at and acknowledge them as well, especially as a way to critique and examine current society/societies. It’s a pity humans didn’t learn from all the mistakes they made in the nineteenth century. Plus it’s also important not to fetishise the nineteenth century and ignore its many problems.  
 
Yes! My fondness does extend to those other periods. I’m not as familiar with the Belle Epoque and the Edwardian period, but I’ve been looking into them more closely recently. One great documentary is BBC’s “Hidden Killers: The Edwardian Home” and it explores the hidden dangers present in every day Edwardian life. Highlights include asbestos clothing and radioactive toothpaste. There’s also accompanying documentaries about the dangers of the Victorian and Tudor homes as well, if you want to track those down. You can usually find them on Youtube. 
“Plus it’s also important not to fetishise the nineteenth century and ignore its many problems.”    Oh, please!  Fetish is what I do best!  Who doesn’t want to fetishize the damage that corsets did to millions of young girls or the incredible evil cleverness of shoving small children down chimneys to clean them, or my favorite, round up all the poor people and making them pick oakum!    So, who is your favorite author from the 19th century?  Who is you favorite artist from the 19th century?  What is your favorite sexual custom of the 19th century?  Have your read Oscar Wilde’s “Salome”?  And what was up with that Little Ice Age? 

Deep Sea Gulper by Phantom September

 Oh geez. Just one author? Asking all the tough questions. Well, I’ll give you one per-country, and cheat with Britain because it encompasses a few different countries.  

England – Charles Dickens 
Ireland – Bram Stoker 
Scotland – Arthur Conan Doyle
(Sorry, Wales. D: )
Russia – Leo Tolstoy
Germany – Karl Marx
France – Alexandre Dumas
Japan – Natsume Souseki
You can just list one, if that’s too much. There’s a good reason that the works of these authors are considered classics. It’s sad that they get passed over as just stuffy old “classics” now. Their work really is actually very good. I’m well aware that there’s not a single female writer on that list, and I’m doing my best to explore the works of more non-male authors from the century. Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, and Jane Austen are excellent, of course. I’m thinking of looking into the work of Marie Corelli, who outsold(!) Arthur Conan Doyle, H.G. Wells, and Rudyard Kipling. I’m most interested in her novel called The Sorrows of Satan
As for an artist, that’s tough as well. Hopefully you’ll indulge me and allow me to list more than one. 
Harry Clarke, Aubrey Beardsley, John Austen, Alphonse Mucha, and Caspar David Friedrich.
 
Sexual custom is actually the easiest. None. I identify as aromantic and asexual, and that sort of stuff just doesn’t interest me. One of the best things about most nineteenth-century fiction (especially novels) is the lack of sex scenes. It’s a total turn off when I read a modern book and am suddenly surprised with a sex scene. It annoys me, and I feel like I’m wasting my time. So with most nineteenth-century fiction it’s like I have this whole century of great fiction that isn’t going to rudely surprise me. XD That being said, there was CERTAINLY tonnes of sexy times and sexy things going on in the nineteenth century for sure. You’ve seen some of Aubrey Beardsley’s drawings. Just like any time period, there were some serious erotic adventures afoot. But I appreciate that it’s a century where I can also easily avoid running across sex scenes in the regular fiction. Works that explore the far reaching effects of lust and desire are fine, and can be very compelling. It’s the unneeded sex scenes that I find annoying. This is a long answer, but I want to try to be clear about the fact that it’s not that I look down on people who do like that sort of thing, and it’s not that I’m in favour of censorship. It’s just not something I find particularly compelling. 
 
Salome! I do love all the Angel of Death imagery. And Beardsley’s illustrations are excellent too, of course. 
 
The little ice age. I do want that back. I want to jump around on the Thames and go to the River Thames Frost Fair. I don’t have much to say about it, except that I really like ice and snow, and would have loved to see the magnificent glaciers back then. 

Oh my!!!!! You have opened up a terrific rabbit hole that we will explore a while later!  It’s going to be the hyper-sex vs. the asexual!   I’m horny already!

I like your answers!  My writers are Joseph Conrad, Guy de Maupassant, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, and Christina Rossetti.  And I have a bad yen for Sir Richard Burton.  And Oscar Wilde makes me laugh.  In terms of artists, I like Christina’s brother, Dante, I like Toulouse-Lautrec, and I like Nadar, and of course Beardsley.  
I have to disagree somewhat about the lit and sex.  Victorian literature is full of repressed sex.  And then there was the thriving unground literary pornography published by the very prolific Anonymous.  I mean, even Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde….. Speaking of Stephenson, have you visited the PIrate’s House in Savannah where supposedly he wrote a lot of “Treasure Island”?  (I have a thing for Savannah too, like a bad sexual thing.)
So, what about all those crazy Victorian parlor languages, like the language of flowers and talking with fans (more Spanish than English, but still…)
(Yusssss. Wilde is awesome. As a side note, I really really want to read his collected letters at some point. I’m sure they are full of sass).

Absolutely. In my response I tried to make it clear that yes, sex is there in the century for those who want to look for it, and yes, there was plenty of porn. Plus syphilis 8D. What I appreciate, is that the mainstream literature doesn’t insist on including graphic sex scenes. Compared to modern literature especially, most of nineteenth-century literature is asexual-friendly literature, which also has the huge plus of being excellent literature. Plus having lots of death, of course. XD

However, I do think that allosexuals tend to read sex into everything anyway, even when it isn’t there. But to each their own, and that’s what’s nice about literature. People can take what they want from it. 
 
Nope, I’ve only been to Savannah once and basically only went to a rare book shop. XD 
 
I do love the language of flowers. I’m not as well-versed in the different parlour languages as I would like to be. It’s one of the next areas I’d like to explore next. The century just keeps revealing new layers to explore. Love it. 

Emri Deer by Phantom September

Parlor languages will completely change the way that you read Victorian literature!  One night when you’re in a really froggy, Vic Lit, English nerd mood, you’ll have to read Rosetti’s “Goblin Market” with a Language of Flowers website up.  It’ll make your head hurt.  

 
But now onto to Edmond.  Tell us all everything there is to know about Edmond and what has happened to him.  He looks a lot like a cat I use to have named Knucklehead who weighed 20lbs (at least).
I’m reading an interesting essay/chapter on the Goblin Market right now, actually! It starts off talking about the terrible frosts that happened in Britain the same year that it was written. I hadn’t really thought about the agricultural history of the century before, but it’s actually pretty interesting, especially with the huge influx of exotic plants and new gardening techniques. I haven’t read the whole essay yet, so I can’t say much more than that so far.

Well, I’d rather not say too much about what happened to Edmond. It makes me anxious to think about it. He managed to get a hold of and eat some leaves (lily leaves) that are very poisonous to cats, and I caught him at it. Usually I’m really careful about anything bad for cats, but one little mistake and things can get deadly pretty quick. Death is a constant companion for everyone. 
 
Edmond himself. He’s afraid of almost everything, and spends most of his time sleeping. Sometimes he plays tag with my dog, but mostly he lounges around trying to look majestic, which is easy since he’s a very pretty cat. He’s even afraid of boxes though. I got him as a stray 6 years ago, so I don’t know what might have caused him to be so afraid, if anything. He’s great though. Very affectionate and gentle. He lets me clip his nails without much fuss and lets me pet his tummy without trying to kill me in return. The one violent thing he does is if I won’t get up and feed him, he’ll literally punch me in the face; he puts all his weight into one paw and then bashes me one in the eye. He’s only 10 pounds, but that’s a ten pound weight dropping itself on one of my eyes. Breakfast is apparently very important to him. I’ve timed him, and he cleans himself every two hours.

In reality, my cat Knucklehead looked nothing like Edmond.

https://life.indiegogo.com/fundraisers/edmond-s-vet-bills-fund

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Say It With A Switch: Integrating floral switches into your play and ritual

If you have not read the section in BDSM Rituals entitled “Cut Me a Switch, Bitch”, please do so now: http://barbedpentacle.blogspot.com/p/rituals.html


“The Rhodora”

On being asked, whence is the flower.

In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes,
I found the fresh Rhodora in the woods,
Spreading its leafless blooms in a damp nook,
To please the desert and the sluggish brook.
The purple petals fallen in the pool
Made the black water with their beauty gay;
Here might the red-bird come his plumes to cool,
And court the flower that cheapens his array.
Rhodora! if the sages ask thee why
This charm is wasted on the earth and sky,
Tell them, dear, that, if eyes were made for seeing,
Then beauty is its own excuse for Being;
Why thou wert there, O rival of the rose!
I never thought to ask; I never knew;
But in my simple ignorance suppose
The self-same power that brought me there, brought you.

          —Ralph Waldo Emerson 

Spring is fast upon us here in the Northern Hemisphere.  In many areas, trees are starting to bloom.  Blooming trees are a big part of why I love spring.  Just the sight of them brings to mind all kinds of exciting ideas.  There’s no reason why these lovely reminders of the Goddess’ Ascent should not be used in both ritual and play or both together.  Nothing is more beautiful than being showered with flying blossoms in a ritual.

A really neat way to incorporate floral switches (or wands if in a vanilla setting) is to use the Victorian Language of Flowers.  There are many different floral languages, some predating Shakespeare, but the Victorian version (and there’s even several different Victorian versions) is usually the easiest to access online.
The meanings that I’ll be using in this blog are from http://www.languageofflowers.com, which uses the meanings that most English Victorians would have recognized and agreed with.

Before I move on with some common flowering trees and their meanings, I need to touch upon usage.  You can create a Simple, or a one element spell, with a switch or bunch of switches from a single tree.  You can also complete more complex spells and messages with switches from several different types of trees.  Think of it in terms of a bouquet of switches for your partner.

Some Floral Switch Suggestions: A Brief Guide
* Denotes trees with nice straight branches of just the right thickness and smoothness for good switches

*Acacia–Friendship;  *Acacia, Rose or White–Elegance;  *Acacia, Yellow–Secret Love



Almond, Common–Indiscretion;  Almond, Flowering–Hope


*Rose of Sharon– Consumed by Love


Apple Blossom–Preference



Ash Tree–Grandeur; Mountain Ash–Prudence



Aspen Tree–Lamentation


*Azalea–Temperance

*Birch–Meekness



*Bay Tree (Laurel)–Sharpness; Laurel, Mountain–Ambition

*Beech Tree–Prosperity

Blackthorn–Difficulty




*Camellia Japonica, Red–Unpretending excellence; *Camellia Japonica, White–Perfected loveliness



*Crepe Myrtle–Eloquence;  Myrtle–Love



Cherry Blossom–Spirituality, Beauty; Cherry Tree–Good education; Cherry Tree, White–Deception;  Winter Cherry–Deception


Chestnut Tree–Do me justice, Luxury

Dogwood–Durability



*Forsythia (these are my favorite for floral switches)–Good nature, Innocence, Anticipation (Aren’t those all the things you want in a good sub?)

Filbert–Reconciliation



*Hazel–Reconciliation, Peace;  *Witch Hazel–A spell


Hawthorn–Hope


Hydrangea–A boaster, Heartlessness,You are cold



Lemon Blossoms–Discretion


*Locust Tree (green)–Affection beyond the grave



Lilac, Field–Humility; Lilac, Purple–First emotions of love;  Lilac, White–Majesty, Purity, Innocence



Lime or Linden Tree–Conjugal fidelity
*Mimosa (Sensitive Plant)–Sensitive, Bashful, Modesty


Mulberry Tree, Black–I shall not survive you; Mulberry Tree, White–Wisdom
Orange Blossom–Woman’s Worth, Bridal festivities;  Orange Tree–Sweetness, Generosity



*Palm–Victory


Pomegranate Flower–Mature elegance


Poplar–Courage; Poplar, White–Time

Peach Blossom–I am your captive


Pear Tree–Comfort


Plum Tree–Keep your promise;  Plum Tree, Wild–Independence


*Rhododendron, Rosebay–Danger, Beware


*Willow, Water–Frankness, Freedom; *Willow, Weeping–Mourning;  *Willow–Forsaken;  *Willow, French-Bravery and humanity  (I really like to use Pussy Willows for switches, but they weren’t in the Language. Pussy Willows are nice because not only can you cause welts, but you can soothe and tickle the welts with the soft pussy buds. And of course, pussy willows are nice against my pussy.)




  As with any sort of S&M and or sex ritual, be responsible.  Use safe words and condoms and respect boundaries.  No under aged participants or spectators.  Outdoor sex should be on private property.  Bondage should allow for blood flow.  If you break skin, use first aid to treat it and clean your equipment properly.  And for heaven’s sake, avoid the spine and kidney area! 


Candlemas: Light my ass up baby and eat whipped cream from my pussy!

Happy Imbolc!


In some traditions, this is the fire festival that celebrates the goddess Brigid, the lambing season, milk, light, the first stirrings of Spring’s return, and the Ascent of the Goddess.  
“I fell you like a child…..”

Brigid is a fire, hearth, and forge goddess from Ireland.  She is also in charge of a variety of other things, from agriculture to crafts and songs/poetry.  She inspires people to be creative.  Imbolc is the perfect time to integrate fire play and dairy into your spiritual and sexual practice.

A very simple way to do this is to integrate wax play into your practice. When the Catholics Christianized Imbolc, they named it Candlemas.  All the candles in a person’s home would be taken to church to be blessed for the year.  Before dripping wax onto your partner, bless and consecrate it with some oil or salt water.


 The type of candle used for wax play is important.  Most people use white paraffin candles because they have a lower melting point.  Colored paraffin candles can be used, but they feel hotter and can occasionally burn. The same is true for scented candles.  While they are nice to smell and use in spells, the oils that make them scented can burn when dripped upon skin.  Never use beeswax or tallow candles.  They burn, burn, burn, and not in a good way!  The heat of the wax can be controlled by the height in which it’s dropped.  The higher up the candle is from flesh, the longer the wax has to cool on the way down.  The closer the wax is to the skin, the less time it has to cool down. 


Candle magic can be incorporated into wax play.  Spells, prayers, and Imbolc wishes can be inscribed onto the candle with the magic being released as the candle burns.  The same things can also be inscribed in the wax that has been dripped onto your partner.  Be very careful that you don’t end up inscribing your partner’s flesh.  I would use a tooth pick instead of a metal stylus.  If you decide to brave colored candles, color magic can also be added to the magical mix. However, white candles can be made to represent any other color, so if in doubt, just stick to white. The more elements used in a spell, the stronger your magic will be.  Repetition of intent is the key to strong spells.

Candle hats, also called St. Lucia wreaths, are a traditional symbol of Bridget’s relation to the rising sun.  Wearing one takes not only faith and courage, but also balance. Candle hats can be easily made from Styrofoam, like an Advent wreath, or it can be made from other materials.  The small candles used for menorahs typically work best.  Large tapers tend to tip over and land in the wearer’s hair.  If the bearer of the wreath is worried about getting wax in their hair, have them wear a shower cap.  As with the wax play, prayers, spells, and wishes can be inscribed on the candles.  The traditional color for the candles is white.
  The wearer can simply stand during the ritual, meditate or pray while wearing it, dance, or for something more elaborate, they can undergo small ordeals, like tickling, figging, clamps, ice, or light spanking.  A Brigid’s Cross would be an excellent object to use for tickling.
Fire play, which is where isopropyl alcohol is swiped onto a person and lit on fire for a short period of time, is another excellent way to celebrate Imbolc, but unlike the previous suggestions, fire play should not be done by inexperienced folks.  It’s dangerous and requires a little bit of training.  That being said, the times that I’ve engaged in fire play, I found it extremely stimulating and fun.  The adrenaline rush will leave you very dreamy. 
Here is a short run down of fire play basics by Iain Turner.  The printable version can be found here. 
“Fire Play basic notes – LDG Fetish Fair – ©Iain Turner 2004-2008spotter. The spotter(s) must be trained and prepared to go towards any problem and fix it, rather than run. I offer a formal class for spotters.Clothes. If you’re in or near a fire scene, don’t wear fuel. All common artificial fibers are fuel – they’re made of petroleum products. They’ll easily ignite or melt into the skin. Do not wear anything with nylon, poly-anything, rubber, latex, PVC, elastic, rayon, etc. Also no fur, feathers, frayed material. Better choices: bare skin, leather, all-cotton, linen, flannel, wool, silk, kevlar, duvetyne.Hair. Hair burns easily. If it gets near fire, it will be gone. Light arm or back hair just burns off. Thicker hair, as at head, beard or crotch, can provide enough fuel to scar the skin. So shave it or cover it. An all-cotton towel or leather hood are good. Hair products are highly flammable; remember Michael Jackson. Likewise, avoid nail polish. No dangling clothes or jewelry. Caution near piercings.Environment
Tips for
● Avoid a gasp that would inhale fire, fuel, smoke, or fire extinguisher products.
● It’s normal to be scared of fire. It’s OK to safeword. It’s important to tell the top if an area has gotten overworked or burned.
● “When your tits are on fire, don’t look down.” If your head is above the flames, look up, not down.
● Don’t run or shake, which add oxygen. If you’re on fire, don’t run from the spotter or top.
● Apply aloe vera for a few days afterwards, even if not burned. This should start during aftercare.
● Your skin is sensitized. Avoid backpacks and harnesses for a day or two, to avoid raising blisters.
● Stay well hydrated (drink water) before and for a few days after the scene.
. Look around for all fuels and damageable items – curtains, carpets, ceiling, cats. Make sure there won’t be people or critters moving who might upset candles or fuel. Fairly dim lighting allows you to see more flame locations. Too dark adds risks, like knocking over fuel or flame. Keep excess fuel at a depot well away from the scene.Bottoms:Spotter’s Job:● You’re covering the top’s back, so the top can focus on the scene. Watch all flame. Watch all fuel, especially any the top’s not watching. Watch the environment, perimeter, and all safety issues.
● Understand the top’s equipment, fuels, locations, and plan before play starts. Know the bottom’s limits. Check how to use extinguisher. There’s no time for questions or doubt during an emergency.
● Keep yourself fuel-free. Have fire suppression tools in your hands, not just nearby. Don’t get distracted; this is a crucial, full-time job.
“When in doubt, put it out.” You can always relight the fire. The difference between a great scene and a bad burn can be one second of excess flame.Spotter tools. My favorite is a very damp (not dripping) all-cotton towel, folded in half or quarters. It smothers a large area of flame quickly, and it cools. Always use both hands. I also have fire extinguishers right by me, if the fire spreads. I also have a water spray/mister.Safety words
spotter is entering the scene now. So “orange leg incoming” tells the top to stop instantly as a spotter comes in to put out the fire (probably on the top’s leg). Play may resume if everything is put in order.
. Spotters or others yell “Orange” to indicate unintended fire. “Incoming” means a Accidents
● Fuel is hard on the eyes/cornea. If it splashes in the eye, hold the eye open and irrigate with saline/water for 15 minutes. See the MSDS. Get immediate medical attention.
. ● If you think there may be skin damage, stop the scene. Apply cold (ice) immediately, for 5+ minutes; residual heat can continue to cook deeper. If you’re considering getting professional attention, don’t add any “burn treatment” goop to the wound, the nurse will just have to dig it out. Fuel: The basic fuel is 70% isopropyl. Other fuels add new issues: 90% isopropyl, ethanol, alcohol gels (Purell), lamp oil, jet fuel, flash cotton, flammable metals, etc. Fuels are poisonous inside the body. Most can explode if vapors accumulate. Fuels can damage clothing, toys and furniture. Fuel Management: A key to safety is controlling all the fuels. Unintended fuels – furniture, dogs, paper, leaves, must be excluded from the area. Intended fuels must be in known places, controlled quantities, and contained. Designate separate areas for fueling, play, extinguishing, and depot. Fuel build up: It’s too easy to accumulate fuel during a scene, on the bottom, top, or furniture. E.g. you apply fuel, burn most of it off, but some remains. After a while, the extra fuel is a big hazard. Sometimes you can see, feel, or smell the fuel. I wipe the area with my hand, then smell the hand. Fuel drip
Different individuals, and different parts of the body have different
: Liquid fuels run, and always to places you don’t want to burn. Especially, don’t let fuel get under the bottom. Use small quantities to avoid drips and runs. tolerances for fire and heat. Genitals
My personal favorites are techniques where I, as top, have the fire on me a lot. This helps me gage the heat, and share the fun. I almost always put out the flames with my bare hand.
Typical burn times are 1 – 3 seconds, but vary greatly by fuel, body part, individual, and technique. Longer burns are possible if the flame moves around the body, never staying on one part.

 

Basic fire play kit

Here are some fire-related
● Torch: A wand/torch/baton with fueled wick is passed around the body, perhaps rubbed or bounced.
● Hand torch: The same, with top’s hand serving as the torch.
● Wipe and light: Apply a streak of fuel, then light it. Put it out (hand or flogger) as it goes.
● Binaca blast / “flame thrower”: Ignite a brief aerosol blast of fuel.
● Flash cotton. Ignited on/above skin. Tricky and dangerous.
● Exotic metals. Add color and sparkle to the flame. Tricky and dangerous.
● Fire mitt. Lighting a kevlar glove on the top’s hand.
● Fire pin. Branding with a red hot needle piercing. Usually intended to be temporary.
● Fire cupping: Igniting fuel inside a cup, quickly applied to skin. Cooling produces suction.
● Candles: Candle flame is too hot for skin. Dripping warm wax is part of Wax Play.
● Fire spinning: Juggling or spinning fire poi near the bottom.
● Fire flogging: Using a lit kevlar flogger on skin. Very problematic.
● Fire breathing: Using the top’s mouth as a flame thrower. Very problematic.
I teach beginning and advanced hands-on fire, and a spotter training class, including handing lots of live fire, and drills for noticing and putting out bad fire.
: Shorten burn times on thinner, or more sensitive skin, especially pink bits. Folded skin can accumulate fuel (bad). Tight spaces can concentrate heat. Don’t burn up your favorite toys. techniques you may see or learn. Each has special issues not covered here. The first four are most common. Most scenes use only 1-3 of these. edukink @ yahoo.com “There are old pilots, and there are bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots.” Successful fire players behave cautiously at all times. More at http://EduKink.org/articles/Fire_Play May your Imbolc be warm and creamy!

Cupping Aftermath

Fire play can be used in spells by drawing sigils or words onto your partner with the alcohol.  As the fuel burns the sigil, which could be for banishing, attracting, or any manner of things, will work it’s magic.  Sigils for self-transformation work particularly well with this, since the sigil’s energy is burned into you–like a brand without the scar. onto your partner with the alcohol.  As the fuel burns the sigil, which could be for banishing, attracting, or any manner of things, will work it’s magic.  Sigils for self-transformation work particularly well with this, since the sigil’s energy is burned into you–like a brand without the scar. Cupping can be used on some of the chakras and is good to use in banishing spells.  The technique has been used for thousands of years as a way of drawing impurities out of the body.

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Another aspect of Imbolc is milk and lactation. Oimelc, another name for the holiday, means “ewe’s milk”.  Any sort of dairy beverage or dish is appropriate for Imbolc as is beer (Brigid controls brewing).  A magical milk bath or milk enema would be a good way to start off your Imbolc practices.  For both of these practices, focus on spiritual nourishment, since that is what milk is typically associated with.

Whipped cream is another fun Imbolc dairy food.  I think the picture is pretty self explanatory.  Use your imagination and enjoy cakes and ale!

May your Imbolc be warm and creamy!