Nun for you, but happy Imbolc!

It’s that time again!  Time to break out the candles and whipped cream.  This year, the Imbolc season coincides with the Super Bowl, so if you’re football inclined, you can cover your special person in wax the same color as your favorite team’s jerseys and then keep score by scratching the score into the cooled wax, like human cuneiform.

But all that aside, let’s talk about nuns.  While Imbolc has several different goddesses associated with it, the most common that you will find if you’ve been doing your Google searches is the goddess Brigid (or Brigit, Briget, Bride, blah, blah, blah).  Brigid is one of a handful of goddesses that transitioned in many parts of the world from Pagan to Christian in the form of a saint.  Although the Catholic Church is loathed to admit it, St. Brigid of Ireland is probably a clever populace’s successful attempt to continue to venerate a favorite goddess within the context of Christianity.

However, Brigid the goddess and Brigid the nun are not so very different.  Granted, Brigid the nun has had her great and vast powers curbed somewhat and has to work within a patriarchal framework, but She still provides succor and healing to those who need it, She still controlled the forges, hearths, and sacred wells.   She still lead a group of women in holy devotion that served Her and carried out Her wants and wishes.  And She was smart and clever when it came to dealing with know-it-all men (look up the story of how Brigid got the land for her monastery).

As Pagans, there are many important lessons that we can learn from nuns.  ”Unconditional” is one of the biggest lessons.  They have given themselves unconditionally to the chosen deity.  They unconditionally do what they feel God and Jesus wants them to do.  They serve unconditionally without any expectations.  ”Submission”  is the other big lesson.  They have found joy in submitting.  Their submission has given them a freedom and the resources to do in the world what they feel called to do.  I’ve heard many Pagans lament the fact that there are not any to very few places for Pagans to go and cloister themselves and submit fully to the Gods and Goddesses.  Perhaps somebody should do something about that.

And now for the nun candy:

These folks say nun for you but some for them!:

Mystic Artisanshttps://www.facebook.com/mysticartisans

Passion And Soulhttp://passionandsoul.com/

Tonia Brown:  www.thebackseatwriter.com

https://www.facebook.com/events/442022209256634/

Quadrivium Supplies:  http://www.quadrivium-supplies.com/  

Hyperdreams Interactive Storieshttp://www.hyperdreams.com/

I’m creamy for you!

 

Imbolc is a creamy holiday.  Oimelc, another name for this holiday, means “ewe’s milk,” so naturally (as long time readers will remember from last year’s post http://barbedpentacle.com/2012/01/candlemas-light-my-ass-up-baby-and-eat-whipped-cream-from-my-pussy/),  milk and milk products are a big part of the celebration.

Imbolc is also a snowy holiday in many areas.  An easy and absolutely divine recipe that’s fun to fix at this time of year is snow cream.

According to brief internet research, snow cream–in some form or another– is a fairly ancient and widespread dish in snowy countries.  There are accounts of pioneers making it, as well as colonists and folks in the “old country”.  Like most simple recipes, there’s a million variations on how to make it and everybody feels that their recipe is best.  My recipe is no different.

Ingredients:  A large bowl of “light” snow (if you live in a snowy area, then you know the difference) collected from a car hood, a patio table, or some other “clean surface”

1 can of sweetened condensed milk (if you open up the can and the substance is watery, then you didn’t read the can properly and you bought evaporated milk).  Sweetened condensed milk cuts out the tedious task of making a simple syrup and waiting for it to cool.

Vanilla extract or other flavoring

In a bowl, add a large amount of snow and a generous portion of sweetened condensed milk, stirring gently, until the contents take on the appearance and taste of homemade ice cream.  Then stir in a small portion (like a 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon) of flavoring.  Serve immediately!

This can be made at home or in ritual for cakes and ale.  It’s also a great treat to have when you’re snowed in and there’s not much else to do except make sweet love down by the fire.

Keep an eye on that sweetened condensed milk as it trickles thickly out of the can and see what it reminds you of!

These folks get creamy when it snows:

Mystic Artisans: https://www.facebook.com/mysticartisans

Passion And Soul: http://passionandsoul.com/

Knotjokin Rope Floggers: http://www.knotjokin.etsy.com

Tonia Brown www.thebackseatwriter.com